Friday, June 29, 2012

SOLEMNITY OF THE APOSTLES PETER AND PAUL

On this feast last year Pope Benedict talked about the words of Jesus: “I no longer call you servants, but friends” (John 15:15). As Apostles of Prayer we are called like Peter and Paul to be friends of Jesus. Out of this friendship arises our concern and prayer for the world. Let us pray for Pope Benedict’s monthly intentions now as we reflect on his words.

What is friendship? … wanting the same things, rejecting the same things: this was how it was expressed in antiquity. Friendship is a communion of thinking and willing. The Lord says the same thing to us most insistently: “I know my own and my own know me” (Jn 10:14). The Shepherd calls his own by name (cf. Jn 10:3). He knows me by name. I am not just some nameless being in the infinity of the universe. He knows me personally. Do I know him? The friendship that he bestows upon me can only mean that I too try to know him better; that in the Scriptures, in the Sacraments, in prayer, in the communion of saints, in the people who come to me, sent by him, I try to come to know the Lord himself more and more. Friendship is not just about knowing someone, it is above all a communion of the will. It means that my will grows into ever greater conformity with his will. For his will is not something external and foreign to me, something to which I more or less willingly submit or else refuse to submit. No, in friendship, my will grows together with his will, and his will becomes mine: this is how I become truly myself. … Lord, help me to come to know you more and more. Help me to be ever more at one with your will. Help me to live my life not for myself, but in union with you to live it for others. Help me to become ever more your friend.

Jesus’ words on friendship should be seen in the context of the discourse on the vine. The Lord associates the image of the vine with a commission to the disciples: “I appointed you that you should go out and bear fruit, and that your fruit should abide” (Jn 15:16). The first commission to the disciples, to his friends, is that of setting out – appointed to go out -, stepping outside oneself and towards others. Here we hear an echo of the words of the risen Lord to his disciples at the end of Matthew’s Gospel: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations ...” (cf. Mt 28:19f.) The Lord challenges us to move beyond the boundaries of our own world and to bring the Gospel to the world of others, so that it pervades everything and hence the world is opened up for God’s kingdom. We are reminded that even God stepped outside himself, he set his glory aside in order to seek us, in order to bring us his light and his love. We want to follow the God who sets out in this way, we want to move beyond the inertia of self-centredness, so that he himself can enter our world.

1 comment:

Holly said...

Good morning Association of Catholic Women bloggers friend~ This morning I have highlighted one of our fellow contributors, Nancy Shuman on “Pay It Forward” at A Life-Size Catholic Blog. I didn’t want you to miss the posting, we are all so busy and it’s easy to overlook one person’s article. However, just in case you wanted to stop by and see what’s going on, I thought I’d leave you a little note.

At the same time, I’d like to offer an invitation for you to link to the “Pay It Forward” link up. You can post about someone else, or link up a post of your own. Have a blessed Sunday! Holly